Thursday, June 10, 2021

What Judas Iscariot Told Jesus At His Arrest

Shortly before Judas Iscariot kissed Jesus to identify him to the officer in charge of that band of men and officers for whom he served as guide, Jesus raised Judas up again by casting the devil out of him when he washed the heel lifted up against him. (John 6:39; 12:31; 13:1-12) The washing by Jesus was a game changer.

Cleansed of the diabolical spirit which put it into his heart to deliver Jesus to the chief priests, Judas began to see the error of his ways.

Not only did he lose his desire to fulfill his obligation under the diabolical covenant he made to deliver Jesus, but he also began seriously to regret making the covenant. Of course, his regret would peak only after he saw Jesus condemned. (Matthew 27:3)

During the washing of his disciples’ feet, Jesus told Judas indirectly that he was not clean. His uncleanness was his fault, and he heard Jesus tell him his fault. (John 13:10)

As a result of telling Judas his fault in a way that Judas, and Judas alone, heard, Jesus gained his brother, Judas. (Matthew 18:15) The bond between Jesus and Judas became a bond of brotherly love. (John 19:26,27)

Unfortunately for both Jesus and Judas, Jesus was still in the process of laying down his life with power, and Judas, you see, was his errand boy. (John 10:17,18; 13:29)

To deliver himself to the chief priests, Jesus chose to send his errand boy to serve as guide for those who would take him. (Acts 1:16) As it happened, his errand boy is the one who had “lifted up his heel against him.” (John 13:18) Therefore, the necessary arrangements for the delivery were already in the works. (Mark 14:10,11)

Immediately after Jesus signified to Judas whom he chose to deliver him--by giving him the sop, after he had dipped it--Satan entered into Judas again. (John 13:23-27)

Satan was opposed to those things of God which Jesus said must happen. (Mark 8:31-33; Matthew 16:21-23) Now, not only did Judas have no desire to fulfill his obligation under the diabolical covenant he made to deliver Jesus, but he became as adamantly opposed to the delivery of Jesus as Simon Peter, who, still not able to deny himself at the scene of the arrest of Jesus, violently attacked Malchus, the servant of the High Priest, and cut off his right ear with his sword. (John 18:10)

For that reason, then, Jesus spoke of the diabolical covenant Judas made as the cross which he had to take up in order to follow him. (Mark 8:34; Matthew 16:24) Jesus knew that the work he gave Judas to finish was no piece of cake. (Mark 14:21; Matthew 26:24)

So, Judas departed from the last supper having just been raised up again by Jesus, and having just been compelled by Jesus to decide quickly whether or not he would take up his cross and follow him, and having just been instructed by Jesus to act quickly so that he was given no opportunity to talk to Jesus about what Jesus had just done for him. (John 13:30)

Nor was he likely to be given that opportunity after he identified Jesus to those who would take him. (John 18:12,13)

The kiss was all that Judas could think of to tell Jesus, but the passion with which he kissed him, and the Greek tells us that it was a fervent kiss, told Jesus all.

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