Saturday, October 16, 2010

Judas Iscariot is "that other disciple," too

John 13:23-28  Now there was leaning on Jesus' bosom one of his disciples, whom Jesus loved.  (24)  Simon Peter therefore beckoned to him, that he should ask who it should be of whom he spake.  (25)  He then lying on Jesus' breast saith unto him, Lord, who is it?  (26)  Jesus answered, He it is, to whom I shall give a sop, when I have dipped it. And when he had dipped the sop, he gave it to Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon.  (27)  And after the sop Satan entered into him. Then said Jesus unto him, That thou doest, do quickly.  (28)  Now no man at the table knew for what intent he spake this unto him.

        The evangelist concealed deliberately the identity of the disciple "whom Jesus loved."


        If it had not been the will of Jesus that "he tarry until I come," the evangelist might have written as follows:

        Now there was leaning on Jesus' bosom Simon's son, Judas Iscariot, whom Jesus loved. Simon Peter therefore beckoned to him, that he should ask who it should be of whom he spake. He then lying on Jesus' breast saith unto him, Lord, who is it? Jesus answered, He it is, to whom I shall give a sop, when I have dipped it. And when he had dipped the sop, he gave it to him who had asked him, Lord, who is it? And after the sop Satan entered into him. Then said Jesus unto him, That thou doest, do quickly. Now no man at the table knew for what intent he spake this unto him.

        If the phrase "no man at the table" means no man except Judas Iscariot, then John 13:28 makes sense if Judas Iscariot is the disciple whom Jesus loved.


        Otherwise, we would expect from the narration that both Judas Iscariot and the disciple whom Jesus loved (someone else at the table) knew for what intent Jesus spoke.

        The identification of Judas as the disciple whom Jesus loved removes that surprise in verse 28.

John 18:15-16  And Simon Peter followed Jesus, and so did another disciple: that disciple was known unto the high priest, and went in with Jesus into the palace of the high priest.  (16)  But Peter stood at the door without. Then went out that other disciple, which was known unto the high priest, and spake unto her that kept the door, and brought in Peter.

        We know from Matthew 26:14-15 that Judas went to the chief priests and covenanted with them to deliver Jesus unto them.


        We know from John 18:3 that just prior to the arrest of Jesus, Judas reported to the chief priests to receive the band of men and officers who would arrest Jesus.

        It's no surprise that Judas would follow Jesus and the arresting party back to the chief priests.

        It's no surprise that he was known unto the high priest. 

        It's no surprise that he was recognized by her that kept the door.

        The profile of Judas matches the profile of "that other disciple," whose identity is concealed (as is the identity of the disciple whom Jesus loved).

Matthew 27:1-3  When the morning was come, all the chief priests and elders of the people took counsel against Jesus to put him to death:  (2)  And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor.  (3)  Then Judas, which had betrayed him, when he saw that he was condemned, repented himself, and brought again the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders,

        It's no surprise that Judas "saw" that Jesus was condemned, if Judas followed Jesus as "that other disciple," whose identity is concealed (as is the identity of the beloved disciple).

        Jesus knew that he would return Judas to the fold after telling him his fault and forgiving him for the trespass against him. In other words, he knew that he would gain his brother. 


        He assigned Judas a place of honor at the table partly in the spirit of rejoicing over the return of that which was lost.
 

        The love that Jesus displayed for Judas in saving him -  loving his own who were in the world unto the last one of them - explains partly the reference to him as the disciple whom Jesus loved.

        This reference is made only after the saving action of the footwashing, and it is made to conceal his identity that he might tarry until Jesus comes.

        The desire of Jesus is to raise him up at the last day. (John 6:39)

        In doing so, Jesus will show judgment to the Gentiles. (Matt 12:18)

        I offer these words only in my own name.

2 comments:

  1. I can't say that I have studied this enough to make a firm conclusion, but I think there is evidence which questions Judas Iscariot as the beloved disciple.

    - First, in John 19:26-27 Jesus unites His mother and the beloved disciple as mother and son. I cannot imagine Mary, being human, could even entertain the thought of the man who betrayed her Son becoming the one who cared for her.
    - Second, when Mary Magdalene discovers the empty tomb in John 20:1-10 she runs to tell the beloved disciple and Peter. I hardly believe Peter would have had anything to do with Judas Iscariot at this time.

    You have no doubt sparked my curiosity though, and I will have to study this much more.

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  2. Thank you for your comment, Straight Talk Steve.

    Jesus foresaw the woe of the one who would deliver him up. Of this we can be sure because the evangelist records it.

    We can be sure that he forsaw the woe of his mother, too, even though it is not recorded.

    Mary knew that her son was laying down his life with power. She knew that no man was taking his life from him. She knew from the time he was twelve that he was about his Father's business, and she knew that she could never dissuade him from it.

    Mary had the greatest respect for the judgment of her son and for what we might call his social skills. Her comment to the servants at the wedding is revealing, "Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it."

    Also, Mary knew Judas. She knew of his woe, too, as he stood near her and, with her, watched the life depart from her son/his teacher-now brother. Judas at no time had anticipated that Jesus would be condemned by the authorities to die. It hit him hard when he saw that Jesus was condemned.

    I think that neither Mary nor anyone else at that time knew the details of the betrayal. Jesus had kept the betrayal a private matter between him and Judas. Judas would later tell Mary about his betrayal. We should not be surprised to learn that she, like her son, forgave him, too.

    (It is important! Being guide to those who arrested Jesus was not the betrayal. The betrayal was the making of a covenant to deliver him to the chief priests when the devil put into his heart to do so. The tradition is strong that Judas betrayed Jesus with a kiss. It is also wrong. He betrayed him with a covenant. In response, Jesus confronted him and forgave him and thus gained his brother. Then, Jesus sent him to be the guide. The covenant that Judas had made, which is the actual betrayal, became the cross which he had to take up to follow Jesus. The English translations of "paradidomi" are uninformed interpretations. Jesus said, "Judas, do you ‘deliver up’ the Son of man with a kiss?" No kiss was ever more sincere. The irony did not escape Jesus.)

    Peter could hardly have had nothing to do with Judas. He was his father.

    It was of his son that Peter asked his Lord, "What shall this man do?"

    If you can receive the words that I'm offering you, then that man of sin is revealed to you, and he tarries no longer. Also, Jesus will return to find faith in his ability to save.

    Still, I offer these words only in my own name.

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